American Diabetes Month: One in 11 Americans Have Diabetes

By: Bel Marra Health | Diabetes | Saturday, November 04, 2017 - 05:30 AM

new-researchDiabetes is one of the leading causes of death and disability in the United States, causing conditions like nerve damage, kidney disease, and even blindness. This is why the American Diabetes Association has determined that November is American Diabetes Awareness Month to spread the word about this serious metabolic condition.
As part of your weekly news round-up, we at Bel Marra feel this cause is worth your attention and have compiled a list of our best articles on the subject. You will find information on type 2 diabetes, how fish oil may protect from the condition, as well as how serious gum disease may lead to diabetes development.

New research finds diabetes is linked to serious gum disease

Diabetes is a multifaceted disease, affecting nearly every function of the human body. It not only prevents the efficient utilization of blood sugar, it can also lead to poor wound healing and vision loss.
A new study out of the University of Pennsylvaniahas linked the metabolic disease to abnormalities of microbes found in the mouth, known as the oral microbiome. This discovery was found using mouse studies with diabetes. Increases in inflammation and bone loss were also found to be associated with diabetes. Continue reading

weight-loss-type-2-diabWeight loss can reverse type 2 diabetes

Having type 2 diabetes, also called adult-onset or non-insulin dependent diabetes, is very commonplace in today’s society. It affects nearly 9.4 percent of the entire U.S. population and this doesn’t show signs of slowing down anytime soon.
This growing trend is in direct correlation with the increasing rates of obesity in American citizens and has even extended to our younger population. The prevalence of type 2 diabetes has made health professionals around the globe concerned about the overall health of those affected, with mental well-being also in jeopardy. Continue reading

early-researchResearch points to type 2 diabetes being a transmissible disease

More than 27 million Americans suffer from type 2 diabetes every day. It is a metabolic condition that affects the body’s ability to regulate the use of blood sugar via a hormone called insulin. Type 2 diabetes has been linked to a variety of genetic causes and environmental risk factors. However, the exact mechanism behind how it develops is not completely understood.
Researchers from McGoven Medical School at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston believe they have discovered the cause of diabetic symptom development. Their findings suggest that the misfolding of a particular protein produced in the pancreas—the organ responsible for insulin production—is the culprit. Continue reading

fresh-fish-oilFresh fish oil found to protect against diabetes development

Diabetes affects nearly 30.3 million Americans with over seven million estimated to not even know they have the metabolic condition. Also, this disease affects our senior population as well, as the percentage of Americans over the age of 65 and older with diabetes is about 25.2 percent, which is about 12 million people.
Living with diabetes can be a real burden, as it comes with a lot of long-term side effects that can affect the quality of life. If not managed properly, it can even lead to death. Diabetes can lead to vision complication, kidney disease, and even complications during pregnancy. Continue reading
scientists-are-one-step-closer

Scientists are one step closer to discovering a cure for type 2 diabetes

Type 2 diabetes affects more than one in 10 adults who are 20 years or older in the United States, with an estimated 1.5 million Americans expected to be diagnosed with the metabolic condition every year. Type 2 diabetes treatment primarily consists of managing symptoms and controlling blood sugar, however, new research suggests we are closer to finally obtaining a cure. Continue reading


Share this information


Advertisement

Popular Stories

Cart Items

Checkout