Heart artery dysfunction in women linked to emotional stress: Study

National Wear Red Day: Heart artery dysfunction, heart disease risk, heart attack mortality in women

Friday February 3, 2017 was National Wear Red Day, an event aimed at raising awareness of the number one cause of death for American women: heart disease. Join Bel Marra Health and Go Red For Women by educating yourself on issues like heart artery dysfunction, heart attack mortality, and the heart disease risk factors.

Heart artery dysfunction in women linked to emotional stress: Study

Heart artery dysfunction in women may be linked to emotional stress. C. Noel Bairey Merz, professor of medicine and senior author, explained “Women who go to emergency rooms and cardiologists because they have chest pain often are told that their arteries are clear and their hearts are fine. But the reality is that women’s coronary artery disease tends to be different from men’s. In women, the large arteries may remain clear, but the smaller branches that connect to the even-smaller capillaries lose their ability to widen. Whether the large arteries are blocked or the small arterioles don’t function correctly, the result is the same — the heart becomes starved for oxygen.” Continue reading…

Heart disease risk increase in middle-aged women due to depressionHeart disease risk increase in middle-aged women due to depression

A history of depression in middle-aged females increases the risk of heart disease, according to new findings. The research reiterates the notion that depression fuels heart problems.

The study tracked 1,100 women over the course of 10 years. The researchers found that depression is a significant risk factor for heart disease.

Heart disease is the leading cause of death among men and women. The CDC reports it is responsible for every one in four deaths. Continue reading…

Heart attack mortality lower in menopausal women, but heart disease and stroke risk may be higherHeart attack mortality lower in menopausal women, but heart disease and stroke risk may be higher

Heart attack mortality is lower among menopausal women compared to men. While menopause is a known risk factor for heart disease, the research study found women faced a lower risk of dying from a heart attack. Unfortunately, the gender differences weren’t as significant among racial minority groups.

The study involved 23,086 black and white men and women over the age of 45. The researchers found that white women who had surgically induced menopause had a 35 percent reduction in non-fatal heart attacks, compared to white men—the risk was reduced by 55 percent in women with naturally occurring menopause. These differences were far less significant among blacks, with a 19 percent reduction among women who had surgically induced menopause and 31 percent reduction in women with naturally occurring menopause. Continue reading…

6 tips for women to achieve a stronger heart6 tips for women to achieve a stronger heart

Heart disease is the leading cause of death in American women, but fortunately, there are many preventative measures one can take in order to reduce the risk. The FDA cardiologist Dr. Shari Targum said in a news release, “The risk of heart disease increases for everyone as they age. For women, the risk goes up after menopause, but younger women can also develop heart disease.” The FDA has created six effective preventative tips for women aimed at lowering their risk of heart disease. Continue reading…

Irregular heartbeat threatens women more than menIrregular heartbeat threatens women more than men

New findings suggest that an irregular heartbeat poses a bigger threat to women than men. Atrial fibrillation—irregular heartbeat—is a risk factor for stroke, heart disease, heart failure, and even death, and this risk is larger in women than men. In fact, women with atrial fibrillation are twice as likely to suffer from stroke as men—this was revealed after reviewing 30 studies involving 4.3 million patients.

Furthermore, women with atrial fibrillation have a 93 percent higher risk of death by a heart condition, 55 percent more likely to suffer a heart attack, 16 percent more likely to develop heart disease, and 12 percent more likely to die from any cause in comparison to men. Continue reading…


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