Weekly health news roundup: High triglycerides, overactive bladder, Alzheimer’s disease, dementia, and heart attack

By: Bel Marra Health | Health News | Sunday, November 06, 2016 - 07:00 AM

High triglycerides: Causes, symptoms, and treatmentThis weekly health news roundup presents our latest news articles discussing high triglycerides, overactive bladder, Alzheimer’s disease, dementia, and heart attack.

This week, we looked at the causes, symptoms, and treatments for high triglycerides, overactive bladder diet, ways to lower Alzheimer’s disease risk, and tips for surviving a heart attack when you’re alone.

High triglycerides: Causes, symptoms, and treatment

Triglycerides are a type of fat converted from any excess calories we do not immediately use.

Mainly derived from fat and carbohydrates we eat, triglyceride stocks are used for energy in-between the meals, but when we take in more than we burn, that’s when the problem arises.

Although cholesterol and fat are essential for the body, keeping your levels within the norm is imperative, as high levels increase the risk of serious health issues, especially cardiovascular ailments. Continue reading…

Overactive bladder diet: Foods and drinks to manage bladder healthOveractive bladder diet: Foods and drinks to manage bladder health

As studies have shown, those who suffer from overactive bladder (OAB) can manage their bladder health with diet adjustments. While it does take a little planning, it can bring many OAB sufferers a lot of relief.

Overactive bladder is best described as a bladder problem that leads to the sudden urge to urinate or the need to urinate frequently throughout the day and night. While volume of fluid intake can have an impact on this condition, there seems to be a lot of personal testimony suggesting the type of fluid and the kind of foods that are consumed play a very big role in the symptom flare-ups. Continue reading…

Alzheimer’s disease risk may be lowered by treating high blood pressure, high cholesterol, and diabetesAlzheimer’s disease risk may be lowered by treating high blood pressure, high cholesterol, and diabetes

Alzheimer’s disease risk may be lowered by treating high blood pressure, high cholesterol, and diabetes. The study followed 837 people with mild cognitive impairment which can progress into Alzheimer’s disease. Of the group, 414 participants had at least on vascular risk factor. Participants completed blood testing and medical history questionnaires, along with other tests measuring blood pressure, body mass, memory, and thinking skills.

Those with vascular risk factors were classified into one of the three groups: no risk factors treated, some risk factors treated, and all risk factors treated. Continue reading…

Dementia risk may increase with general anesthesia exposure in elderly patients: StudyDementia risk may increase with general anesthesia exposure in elderly patients: Study

Dementia risk may increase with general anesthesia exposure in elderly patients. The risk of developing dementia is 35 percent higher in those seniors who were exposed to general anesthesia. Other studies have found that post-operative cognitive dysfunction (POCD) can progress into dementia several years later.

The study found that some anesthetics could promote inflammation of neural tissue, leading to POCD or Alzheimer’s disease precursors.

The researchers assessed the risk of dementia associated with general anesthesia in a prospective population-based cohort of elderly patients. Participants were interviewed at baseline and then again two, four, seven, and 10 years later. At each examination, there was a complete cognitive evaluation with systematic screening for dementia. Continue reading…

Surviving a heart attack when you are aloneSurviving a heart attack when you are alone

A heart attack can be a fatal occurrence, so receiving treatment as soon as possible can reduce your risk of mortality. If you are with someone then they can call 911 and help you while you both wait for an ambulance, but if you’re alone you may not be able to get help as quickly.

It’s important to recognize the warning signs of a heart attack, so that you are able to call for help sooner rather than later. Early warning signs of heart attack include chest pain, shortness of breath, feeling sick to your stomach, dizziness or lightheadedness, anxiety, cold sweats, headache, jaw pain, sudden and unexplained fatigue, or nausea and vomiting. Continue reading…


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