Author Archives : Sarah Cownley

Sarah began her interest in nutritional healing at an early age. After going through health problems and becoming frustrated with the conventional ways doctors wanted to treat her illness (which were not working), she took it upon herself to find alternative treatments. This led her to revolutionize her own diet to help her get healthier and tackle her health problems. She began treating her illness by living a more balanced lifestyle through healthy food choices, exercise and other alternative medicine such as meditation. This total positive lifestyle change led her to earn a diploma in Nutritional Therapy from Health Sciences Academy in London, England. Today, Sarah enjoys helping others by teaching healthy lifestyle changes through her personal consultations and with her regular contributions to the Doctors Health Press. Also, passionate about following her dreams in life, Sarah moved to France and lived in Paris for over 5 years where she earned a certification in beadwork and embroidery from Lesage (an atelier owned by Chanel). She then went on to be a familiar face sitting front row and reporting from Paris Fashion Week. Sarah continues to practice some of the cultural ways of life she learned while in Europe. They enjoy their food, and take the time to relax and enjoy many of life’s little moments. These are life lessons she is glad to have brought back home with her.

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Consuming Green Tea Extract Can Support Healthy Blood Sugar Levels and Improve Gut Health

Experts recommend consuming green tea extract to support healthy blood sugar levels and improve gut health. Studies have shown that green tea extract can help improve glucose tolerance and reduce inflammation in the gut in people with a cluster of heart disease risk factors. Additionally, green tea extract has been linked with several other health ...click here to read more

PAD Patients Can Improve Their Walking Ability by ‘No Pain, No Gain’ Approach

New research published in the Journal of the American Heart Association suggests that walking at a pace that induces pain or discomfort could improve walking ability among patients with peripheral artery disease (PAD). While most people believe they must stop exercising when experiencing pain, this study demonstrates that that thought may not apply to all ...click here to read more

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