Weekly health news roundup: Atrial fibrillation, tinnitus, conjunctivitis, urinary tract infections, and cataracts

By: Bel Marra Health | Health News | Sunday, September 25, 2016 - 09:00 AM

This weekly health news roundup present the latest news and findings on atrial fibrillation, tinnitus, conjunctivitis, urinary tract infections, and cataracts. This week, we discussed the negative effects of atrial fibrillation on strength and balance, causes and symptoms of tinnitus, natural home remedies for pink eye, risk assessment for urinary tract infections in women, and the risk of cataracts and dementia.

Atrial fibrillation in older adults may affect strength, balance, gait speed, and coordination: Study

Atrial fibrillation in older adults may affect strength, balance, gait speed, and coordination. A study has found that atrial fibrillation – a common form of irregular heartbeat – can accelerate age-related declines in walking speed and strength.

Lead author Jared W. Magnani said, “Particularly in older adults, we need to be mindful that the effects of atrial fibrillation (AFib or AF) go beyond increasing the risk of heart failure and stroke. We learned from this study that older adults with AFib are especially vulnerable to losing strength, balance, gait speed, and coordination.” Continue reading…

Tinnitus causes, signs, and symptoms

Tinnitus is a hearing condition in which a patient hears constant ringing, buzzing, or humming even when no sound is present. For some, tinnitus may only be noticeable at night or in quiet environments, as the ringing isn’t as noticeable when the noise is present. Because of this constant ringing, tinnitus can impede on getting eight hours of a solid uninterrupted sleep due to tossing and turning.

Tinnitus may also make it difficult for a person to pay attention to others or concentrate on one thing, so it definitely has a negative impact on one’s overall quality of life. Continue reading…

Natural home remedies for conjunctivitis (pink eye) in elderly

Conjunctivitis, or pink eye, is the inflammation or infection of the conjunctiva, the transparent membrane that lines the eyelid and white part of the eyeball. Inflamed blood vessels turn pink or red, which makes them more noticeable. The good news is, the condition does not affect your vision, although it can be irritating and contagious.

Conjunctivitis is caused by inflammation, infection, or allergic reaction. Bacteria can enter the eye through rubbing, contaminated fluid, or a foreign object touching the eye.

Both viruses and bacteria can lead to conjunctivitis. If someone with conjunctivitis touches their eye and comes in contact with someone else or with objects other people may touch, an unsuspecting person may pick up the infection and develop pink eye. It is spread easily. Continue reading…

Urinary tract infection risk assessed in women after pelvic organ prolapse surgery and urinary incontinence: Study

Urinary tract infection risk increases in women after pelvic organ prolapse surgery or urinary incontinence, so a new method has been developed to assess that risk. Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are a common type of infection, costing roughly $1 billion annually in the U.S. The risk of UTIs among women who undergo pelvic organ prolapse surgery and who have urinary incontinence is much greater than in women without these conditions.

The study found that certain urinary bacteria and antimicrobial peptides, which promote proper functioning of the bladder immune system, may help identify a woman’s risk of UTI following pelvic floor surgery. Continue reading…

Cataract surgery in dementia patients may improve vision and slow mental decline: Study

Cataract surgery in dementia patients may improve vision and slow mental decline: StudyCataract surgery in dementia patients may improve vision and slow mental decline. The researchers suggest that quality of life also improved after cataract surgery.

Researcher Dr. Alan Lerner said, “These preliminary results indicate that improved vision can have a variety of benefits for people with dementia and their loved ones, both visual and non-visual.”

Cataract surgery involves removing the eye’s cloudy lens and replacing it with an artificial clear lens.

The study included 20 dementia patients who had cataract surgery along with a control group of eight patients who did not undergo the surgery. Continue reading…


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