Study says most people go to the toilet wrong

By: Bel Marra Health | Colon And Digestive | Saturday, July 25, 2015 - 04:40 PM

get relief from constipationThe fact of the matter is we all poop. I apologize for being frank, but let’s call a spade a spade and discuss a topic that is rarely brought up. There are many issues associated with pooping such as constipation, diarrhea and diverticulitis.

Diverticulitis, in particular, is a condition where bulging pouches develop along the digestive tract and may burst when they become inflamed or infected. This can cause pain, abdominal tenderness and even fever. It’s a serious condition that often affects those who consume a typical American diet. And the older we get, the more likely we are to develop diverticulitis. The best thing we can do is to prevent these bulges. And how we poop can make all the difference.

Why squatting is the right way to poop

Diproper way to poopd you know you’re most likely releasing your bowels incorrectly? You may be puzzled by that statement, but it’s true. You probably think simply entering the bathroom, taking a seat on your porcelain throne and allowing nature to take is course is correct – it’s not.

There is actually a much more effective way to go number two – and it can help prevent diverticulitis as well.

As research points out, we should be squatting over the toilet for maximum efficiency. In a study published in Digestive Diseases and Sciences, participants who squatted while pooping only took 51 seconds. Those who sat down on the toilet took 130 seconds.

But efficiency isn’t the only benefit here. Those who squat have fewer incidences of diverticulosis and hemorrhoids.

So why exactly is it more beneficial to squat? When we are in a squatting position it releases pressure put on the rectum, which allows for easier fecal elimination. Translation: No pushing required.

How to squat over the toilet

While squatting might be difficult for those who are older, are not as strong or have trouble staying balanced, there are ways to make it easier and more comfortable. Consider placing a stool or box in front of the toilet. When you sit down, place your feet on top of the object so it brings your knees up higher. If you want to get really high-tech companies have actually developed devices that you can place in front of your toilet.

Adding a stool or box can help you properly position yourself for a better bathroom experience.

Consequences of constipation

Constipation is bad for overall health. We are meant to easily release all that build-up, but when we can’t go, it can have kidney-stones-in-summerdetrimental effects on our health.

Constipation can lead to hemorrhoids, rectal bleeding, feces building up along the colon walls, weight gain and overall discomfort and abdominal pain. It’s important to take the necessary steps to prevent constipation.

5 ways to prevent constipation

There are easy steps you can take – besides squatting on a toilet – that can help alleviate constipation. Some include:

  • Eating fiber
  • Staying hydrated
  • Exercising
  • Eating fruits and vegetables
  • Not “holding it in.”

By following these tips you can better prevent constipation and live a healthier life.

Related Reading:

Don’t let constipation land you in the ER

According to the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Disease, constipation refers to having less than three bowel movements a week. Furthermore, it is estimated that 42 million Americans suffer from constipation at some point. Although constipation can be a matter that can be taken care of at home, people are heading over to their local hospitals to seek relief. Continue reading…

10 natural remedies for constipation

The whole experience of constipation is so frustrating and even painful, some people put off “going” for three to four days, sometimes even more. But in the long run, this will make matters worse as the stools will become even harder to expel. While constipation in itself is worth worrying about, it can have other serious complications. Continue reading…

Sources:

http://www.nhs.uk/Conditions/Constipation/Pages/Prevention.aspx
http://www.womenshealthmag.com/health/squatting-while-pooping
http://www.medicinenet.com/diverticulosis/article.htm
http://www.healthyfoodhouse.com/what-is-the-proper-way-to-poop/
http://www.nhs.uk/conditions/Constipation/Pages/Introduction.aspx


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