Multiple sclerosis disease activity link to food allergies studied

By: Devon Andre | Allergies | Thursday, April 28, 2016 - 12:30 PM

Multiple sclerosis disease activity link to food allergies studiedMultiple sclerosis disease activity link to food allergies has been studied. The findings of the study revealed that multiple sclerosis patients with a history of food allergies show an increase in disease activity.

The participants of the Comprehensive Longitudinal Investigation of Multiple Sclerosis at the Brigham and Women’s Hospital (CLIMB) completed a self-administered questionnaire. The findings of the ongoing study revealed that patients with food allergies have a greater disease activity in multiple sclerosis, compared to those without any allergies.

Patients were classified in two groups: allergic or not allergic. There were 922 allergic patients and 427 not allergic patients. A history of food, environmental, and drug allergies were reported in 238, 586, and 574 patients respectively.

The findings of the study suggest that multiple sclerosis patients with food allergies have higher disease activity, compared to patients without allergies.

Managing allergies in multiple sclerosis

Managing allergies in multiple sclerosis can help reduce disease activity. Here are some tips to better control your allergies no matter what they are in order to better manage multiple sclerosis overall.

  • Avoid contact with allergens when possible.
  • Keep windows and doors closed during high pollen times.
  • Change clothes immediately after returning from the outdoors.
  • Dust furniture with a damp cloth, vacuum weekly, and get a high efficiency air purifier.
  • Try over-the-counter allergy medications.

Speak to your doctor about allergy medications, as many drugs come with side effects. If you want to avoid them, research which medication offers the least amount of side effects.


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Sources:
http://www.neurology.org/content/86/16_Supplement/P2.187.short
https://www.firstwordpharma.com/node/1376341
http://www.imsmp.org/news/allergies-ms


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